Turning desert to fertile farmland on the Loess Plateau

Posted on Thursday, April 5th, 2018 by

Around 3,000 years ago, farmers settled on the fertile Loess Plateau in western China, a region about the size of France. By the 7th century, the rich soils were feeding about one quarter of the Chinese population. But intense pressure on the land eroded the soil. By the 20th century, desertification had condemned the remaining […]

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“Transforming The Food System Is Key”

Posted on Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018 by

Two scholars, from Haiti and Brazil, discuss the global solidarity that forms between states who have faced similar oppressions. Food sovereignty is a necessary part of resistance movements in the Global South, they say, because it gets to the heart of Western imperialism and occupation. Thanks to the Vera List Center. This interview was filmed […]

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Transforming The Food System Is Key

Posted on Tuesday, March 27th, 2018 by

Two scholars, from Haiti and Brazil, discuss the global solidarity that forms between states who have faced similar oppressions. Food sovereignty is a necessary part of resistance movements in the Global South, they say, because it gets to the heart of Western imperialism and occupation. Thanks to the Vera List Center. This interview was filmed […]

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Millions of Chinese farmers reap benefits of huge crop experiment

Posted on Friday, March 16th, 2018 by

Rice farmers in China increased their crop yields when they adopted new evidence-based farming practices.Credit: KeystoneUSA-ZUMA/REX/Shutterstock A landmark project to make agriculture more sustainable in China has significantly cut fertilizer use while boosting crop yields on millions of small farms across the country, researchers report in Nature1. As part of a decade-long study, scientists […]

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Farmer-scientists driving social change

Posted on Friday, March 16th, 2018 by

On a brilliant day in July, twenty-some years ago, I stood ankle-deep in the cool mud of a fragrant rice field in central Thailand, listening to the farmers around me discuss the bugs on the plants (were these “satru puut” or “satru thammachat”? pests or natural enemies?), and whether or not the Nitrogen-fixing aquatic Azolla they had […]

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How Crushed Volcanic Rock in Farm Soil Could Help Slow Global Warming

Posted on Wednesday, February 21st, 2018 by

Volcanic plains tend to be fertile farmland. A new study explores how spreading crushed volcanic rock on farms can increase carbon storage and crop yields. Credit: SounderBruce/CC-BY-SA-2.0 Pulverizing volcanic rock and spreading the dust like fertilizer on farm soils could suck billions of tons of carbon from the atmosphere and boost crop yields […]

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Farming crops with rocks could reduce carbon dioxide

Posted on Tuesday, February 20th, 2018 by

A new study has found that farming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The pioneering research by scientists at the University of Illinois, together with U.S. and international colleagues, suggests that adding fast-reacting silicate rocks to croplands could capture CO2 and give increased […]

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Farmland could be used to sustainably offset America’s entire carbon footprint

Posted on Wednesday, January 31st, 2018 by

Amid the roaring debate on how to curb climate change in Bonn last year, an impasse was finally broken on agriculture. Both a cause and casualty of climate change, our food system accounts for up to 24% of greenhouse gas emissions. Yet hit by soaring temperatures and more frequent extreme weather, farming is becoming […]

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Why Urban Farming Is Key in the Fight Against Hunger and Climate Change

Posted on Friday, January 19th, 2018 by

The urban farms sprouting up and across cities around the world aren’t just feeding mouths—they are “critical to survival” and a “necessary adaptation” for developing regions and a changing climate, according to a new study. Urban farms—which include plain old allotments, indoor vertical farms and rooftop gardens nestled amongst busy streets and skyscrapers—have become increasingly popular and important as the world’s population […]

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This Indonesian man single – handedly saves his village from starvation

Posted on Sunday, January 7th, 2018 by

Sadiman, a 67-year-old man from the Wonogiri regency of Central Java, Indonesia, has managed to turn his drought-prone village into a groundwater-rich region by leading a campaign to replant trees on a nearby hill for the past 21 years. Since 1996, Sadiman, a farmer in Dali hamlet, in the Wonogiri regency of Central Java, […]

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