Known around the world as a zero-waste town, Kamikatsu, Japan has an impressive waste management program that recycles or composts 80 percent of the waste of its residents, with the aim of becoming completely zero-waste by 2020.

So it makes sense that one of the town’s latest community-oriented buildings has incorporated this strong recycling and reuse ethos. Created by Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP (and briefly touched upon by Lloyd in a post earlier this year), the Kamikatz Public House is a brewery and pub that functions as a gathering place, while also selling household supplies, food, and of course, beer.

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

 

The building is also a visible symbol of the town’s zero-waste goals, as it is made from many recycled materials and furnishings, from the large, 8-metre (26 feet) high facade outfitted with reclaimed double-pane windows, to the refurbished items inside, some of which were salvaged from around the town itself. For instance, tiles from an abandoned factory were brought in to be used as flooring, cleaned bottles were used for a custom chandelier, while the walls have been covered with recycled newspaper. Outside, the cedar cladding was painted with a natural, tannin-based paint.

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

 

The architects say:

We gathered windows that illuminated the town in the past and dedicated our wish that they would serve as a lantern of hope to shine upon the town struggling with a declining population. The space is full of improvisation and discoveries with this creative combination of waste material for this architecture. The locals who gather at this pub are beginning to truly realize that their actions are fun and creative.

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP

 

 

As more and more people wake up to the fact that we are choking ourselves and the planet with excessive packaging and waste, the zero-waste movement is gaining ground worldwide, hopefully not just in our homes, but also in our building industries too. As this project shows, recycling these “waste” materials can actually result in a beautiful new place for a whole community to enjoy. For more, visit Hiroshi Hakamura & NAP.

read more original article Treehugger


Date: 2017-11-09


agriculture Agroforestry algae alternative enegy alternative energy batteries bees biofuel carbon capture carbon farming carbon sequestration climate change co2 compost conservation ELECTRIC CAR farming food waste forests fuel efficiency green building green energy green roofs hemp innovative design innovative products NATURE natures wonders plastic recycle refridgeration regenerative agriculture renewable energy repurpose reuse soil solar trees urban farming waste water wave energy WETLANDS wind power zero waste

Excess Access Program

Link Surplus with Needs - It's Free, Fast, Easy!
Donate Hair, Donate Stuff, Donate Food...
EA Register Donate Stuff
Matter Of Trust Inc